Learning Disabilities Awareness Month

October is Learning Disabilities Awareness Month. Perhaps your life has been touched in some way by a learning disability. If so, there are some amazing resources for you, whether a parent, a student, or educator. LD Online is one of them, which provides guides for educators and parents. One I would like to highlight is an article outlining very useful information for parents of students with learning disabilities and how to help them experience success. It is based on longitudinal research and identifies 6 success attributes that really make a difference and are more important than IQ and grades: Continue reading

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September: National Suicide Prevention Month

I’m editing this post because I failed to add a resource. The Jason Foundation is a wonderful resource for youth, parents, students, parents, and professionals. They provide training modules and provide valuable information. There is also an app called “A Friend Asks” that provides tips for helping a friend who may be at risk for suicide. Please check it out and pass it along!

This month, I would like to touch on a subject that not many people want to talk about: suicide. It’s likely that your life has been affected by suicide in some way.

Last year, we held an assembly for our high school students on awareness and prevention. To start the assembly, everyone was asked to stand up if their lives had been touched in some way by suicide. Continue reading

School Phobia, Continued: From School Phobic to School Psychologist–Strategies for Parents

In my previous post, Part 2, I discussed my experience as a child in school and shared some strategies that worked and didn’t work so well. Here are a few strategies that can be invaluable for you as parents to help your child with anxiety, whether about school or anything else.

  1. Recognize physical symptoms. Our body will tell us when we are anxious. Our pulse increases, we might feel light-headed, or our muscles may get tense. Talk to your child about what is going on when they are anxious. First, ask them what they notice about their bodies when they become anxious. Often, children are able to identify the signs. If your child is very young or otherwise unable to identify physical symptoms, you can help them by observing them when you know they are getting anxious to see if you recognize any obvious symptoms. Once your child is able to identify the symptoms, help them to use calming strategies, such as the following ones, when they notice their bodies telling them they are anxious.

Continue reading

School Phobia, Part 2: From School Phobic to School Psychologist–Strategies That Worked and Didn’t

In Part 1, I described my experience with school phobia and anxiety and mentioned that I won the fight over fear. Ultimately, I continued my education and became a school psychologist in which part of my job involves working with students who have similar issues. In this post, I would like to highlight some of the strategies that worked for me and some that didn’t. I don’t think I ever would have been able to identify these strategies if I hadn’t had the experience I did in graduate school. It was an aha moment and profoundly therapeutic. It happened informally one day while I was visiting with one of my psychology professors who was a counselor. Continue reading